Care for yusheng without the ‘yu’? Or one that's shaped like a dog and costs S$999?

Care for yusheng without the ‘yu’? Or one that's shaped like a dog and costs S$999?

Channel NewsAsia·2018-02-03 20:25

Where to find eight new-fangled yusheng creations in Singapore to raise your chopsticks to this Chinese New Year.

Limited Edition Masterpiece Yusheng. Photo: The Fullerton Hotel

The upcoming Year of the Dog has restaurants chasing their tails to dream up ever more creative renditions of that luck-bringing, toss-worthy festive dish, yusheng.

Some offer eight times the “yu” (the homonym for “fish” and “abundance”), while others show off an artistic streak with edible paintings of pooches on the platter. Some throw tradition right out the window by using meat rather than fish, and others price their creation at a hongbao-busting S$999.

Here are eight new-fangled options to raise your chopsticks to. Huat, ah! And please mind the carpet.

PROSPERITY SALMON AND ABALONE YUSHENG AT MIN JIANG

Prosperity Salmon & Abalone Lo Hei at Min Jiang. Photo: Goodwood Park Hotel

Yusheng is art as Chef Chan Hwan Kee paints a picture of a Pekinese perched on the foothills of a mountain upon which a cherry blossom tree grows. Never mind the perspective (the tree and dog appear suspiciously larger than the mountain), the edible stuff on the plate offers plenty of “huat”.

There are raw slices of salmon or abalone arranged to resemble the sun, and the likes of wild arugula, yellow frisee, red sorrel, red mustard greens, shredded carrots, baby and white radish, pomelo pulp, sesame seeds, pine nuts and crispy strips of fried sweet potatoes and yam.

All this gets tossed in a piquant dressing brightened with lime juice, lemongrass and plum sauce.

S$168, feeds 8 to 10 people. Available for dine-in only at Min Jiang and Min Jiang One-North.

PROSPERITY SMOKED SALMON YUSHENG AT DIN TAI FUNG

Prosperity Smoked Salmon Yusheng. Photo: Din Tai Fung

Rather than raw salmon, Taiwanese dumpling specialists Din Tai Fung serves smoked salmon in its yusheng, lending the dish a distinctly savoury dimension. 

The mix includes Tianjin roasted chestnuts, crispy strips of yam, white radish and carrots, all to be tossed in a tangy plum sauce. 

Maximalists will appreciate the top-up options, which include pine nuts, fried salmon skin, and smoked unagi (freshwater eel).

S$48.80, feeds 4 to 6 people. Available for dine-in and take-away at all Din Tai Fung outlets.

SIGNATURE LOU HEI AT CASSIA

Cassia Signature Lou Hei Platter. Photo: Cassia

Shredded vegetables moulded into a pyramid are accompanied by premium ingredients imbued with symbolism. 

Think lobster, to signify happiness throughout the year; North Pole clams, symbolising abundant opportunities; and salmon to represent success. 

Toss it all in an earthy hawthorn sauce and harmony should be yours to enjoy.

S$38 per person, minimum 2 pax. Available for dine-in only, at Cassia.

KANPACHI KINGFISH YUSHENG AT MITZO

Kanpachi Kingfish Yusheng. Photo: Mitzo

Yusheng here is served with a side of drama as servers make a show of mixing a savoury sauce comprising ingredients such as soybeans, garlic, ginger, spices and sesame seeds by the table – in a cocktail shaker.

This is poured over a vibrant mix of shredded vegetables, crispy lotus root, toasted pistachios and crispy salmon skin for added crunch. Generous slivers of kingfish sashimi are added to the mix, along with orbs of lychee caviar that pop delightfully in the mouth.

Vegetarians can opt for the Fruits Yusheng, which comes with mango, rock melon, honeydew, pomelo and pomegranate, and topped with crispy enoki mushrooms and bouncy konnyaku jelly.

S$78, feeds 4 to 6 people. Available for dine-in only, at Mitzo.

LIMITED EDITION MASTERPIECE YUSHENG AT THE FULLERTON HOTEL

Limited Edition Masterpiece Yusheng. Photo: The Fullerton Hotel

At Jade restaurant, the limited edition Masterpiece Yusheng isn’t just treated like art, it’s also priced like it.

For S$999, Chinese Executive Chef Leong Chee Yeng will fashion an image of a shaggy-maned Pekinese — favoured by China’s imperial court thanks to its likeness to a lion — out of salmon slices and vegetables including carrots, pickled ginger, beetroot and candied orange peel. The dish comprises 23 ingredients such as pickled papaya, champagne jelly, yuzu, lettuce and a honey pineapple dressing.

What warrants the hefty price tag of what is essentially a well-presented plate of vegetables and fish? Artistry, of course. A spokesperson for the hotel said the dish takes more than six hours to prepare.

S$999, feeds 8 to 10 people. Must be ordered at least three days in advance. Available for dine-in only at Jade.

“SURE HUAT” YUSHENG AT LOCAL RESTAURANT & BAR

Sure HUAT Yusheng. Photo: Local Restaurant & Bar

Slivers of smoked Norwegian salmon are set in tomato jelly shaped like koi. The jellied fish circle a mound of colourful vegetables, served with a decidedly savoury dressing spiked with spring onions and ginger. Great if you don’t like your yusheng too sweet. 

S$39.80, feeds 6 people. Available for dine-in and take-away at Local Restaurant & Bar.

FORTUNE YUSHENG PLATTER AT FiSK SEAFOOD BAR & MARKET

Fortune Yusheng Platter. Photo: FiSK Seafoodbar & Market

If yours is a family that usually forks out for extra fish in your yusheng, then this is the platter for you. It harbours eight types of seafood for extra “yu”. 

There is Norwegian salmon and trout, New Zealand abalone, Japanese octopus, yellowtail, yellowfin tuna and otoro (the fattiest and most prized part of the tuna belly).

Of course, there are the vegetables — shredded cucumber and carrots — and a tasty sauce, but when you have that much yu with your sheng, the rest is just gravy.

S$128.80, feeds 6 to 10 people. Available for dine-in and take-away at FiSK Seafoodbar & Market.

PULLED PORK LOHEI! AT THE CARVERY

Pulled Pork Lohei. Photo: The Carvery

And then there’s yusheng without the yu. 

At roast meat buffet restaurant The Carvery, the carefully named Pulled Pork Lohei! (the exclamation mark is there for good reason) comes with caramelised walnuts, shredded Granny Smith apples, red cabbage, orange pearls, fried pickled ginger and fried fish skin, all to be dressed in a white balsamic peach sauce and topped with crispy tortilla crackers. 

Yusheng purists can turn away now.

S$38.80, feeds 4 to 6 people. Available for dine-in and take-away at The Carvery.

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